See how GRALISE provides lasting PAIN RELIEF for your patients with PHN1,3,4

Michelle Brown, MD, talks about the unique features of GRALISE.
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PHN=Postherpetic neuralgia.

Gabapentin is a controlled substance in several states. Contact local authorities for more information. Advise patients to take GRALISE only as prescribed.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

GRALISE is indicated for the management of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). GRALISE is not interchangeable with other gabapentin products because of differing pharmacokinetic profiles that affect the frequency of administration.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

CONTRAINDICATIONS

GRALISE is contraindicated in patients who have demonstrated hypersensitivity to the drug or its ingredients.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

The safety and efficacy of GRALISE in patients with epilepsy has not been studied.

Suicidal Behavior and Ideation

Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) including gabapentin, the active ingredient in GRALISE, increase the risk of suicidal thoughts or behavior in patients taking these drugs for any indication. Patients treated with any AED for any indication should be monitored for the emergence or worsening of depression, suicidal thoughts or behavior, and/or any unusual changes in mood or behavior.

Withdrawal of Gabapentin 

Gabapentin should be withdrawn gradually. If GRALISE is discontinued, this should be done gradually over a minimum of 1 week or longer (at the discretion of the prescriber).

Tumorigenic Potential

In standard preclinical in vivo lifetime carcinogenicity studies, an unexpectedly high incidence of pancreatic acinar adenocarcinomas was identified in male, but not female, rats. The clinical significance of this finding is unknown.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

The most common side effects were dizziness (10.9%) and somnolence (4.5%).

Across all GRALISE clinical trials the other most common adverse reactions (≥2%) are dizziness, somnolence, headache, peripheral edema, diarrhea, dry mouth, and nasopharyngitis. The types and incidence of adverse events were similar across age groups except for peripheral edema, which tended to increase in incidence with age.

DRUG INTERACTIONS

An increase in gabapentin AUC values has been reported when administered with hydrocodone or morphine.

It is recommended that GRALISE be taken at least 2 hours following antacid administration.

USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS
Pregnancy Category C: 

GRALISE should be used during pregnancy or in women who are nursing only if the benefits clearly outweigh the risks.

Pediatric Use

The safety and effectiveness of GRALISE in the management of postherpetic neuralgia in patients less than 18 years of age has not been studied.

Geriatric Use

The total number of patients treated with GRALISE in controlled clinical trials in patients with postherpetic neuralgia was 359, of which 63% were 65 years of age or older. The types and incidence of adverse events were similar across age groups except for peripheral edema, which tended to increase in incidence with age.

Hepatic Impairment

Because gabapentin is not metabolized, studies have not been conducted in patients with hepatic impairment.

Renal Impairment

Dosage adjustment of GRALISE is necessary in patients with impaired renal function. GRALISE should not be administered in patients with creatinine clearance <30 mL/min or in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Reductions in GRALISE dose should be made in patients with age-related compromised renal function.

For more information about GRALISE, please see full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

GRALISE is indicated for the management of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). GRALISE is not interchangeable with other gabapentin products because of differing pharmacokinetic profiles that affect the frequency of administration.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

CONTRAINDICATIONS

GRALISE is contraindicated in patients who have demonstrated hypersensitivity to the drug or its ingredients.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

The safety and efficacy of GRALISE in patients with epilepsy has not been studied.

Suicidal Behavior and Ideation

Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) including gabapentin, the active ingredient in GRALISE, increase the risk of suicidal thoughts or behavior in patients taking these drugs for any indication. Patients treated with any AED for any indication should be monitored for the emergence or worsening of depression, suicidal thoughts or behavior, and/or any unusual changes in mood or behavior.

Withdrawal of Gabapentin 

Gabapentin should be withdrawn gradually. If GRALISE is discontinued, this should be done gradually over a minimum of 1 week or longer (at the discretion of the prescriber).

Tumorigenic Potential

In standard preclinical in vivo lifetime carcinogenicity studies, an unexpectedly high incidence of pancreatic acinar adenocarcinomas was identified in male, but not female, rats. The clinical significance of this finding is unknown.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

The most common side effects were dizziness (10.9%) and somnolence (4.5%).

Across all GRALISE clinical trials the other most common adverse reactions (≥2%) are dizziness, somnolence, headache, peripheral edema, diarrhea, dry mouth, and nasopharyngitis. The types and incidence of adverse events were similar across age groups except for peripheral edema, which tended to increase in incidence with age.

DRUG INTERACTIONS

An increase in gabapentin AUC values has been reported when administered with hydrocodone or morphine.

It is recommended that GRALISE be taken at least 2 hours following antacid administration.

USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS
Pregnancy Category C: 

GRALISE should be used during pregnancy or in women who are nursing only if the benefits clearly outweigh the risks.

Pediatric Use

The safety and effectiveness of GRALISE in the management of postherpetic neuralgia in patients less than 18 years of age has not been studied.

Geriatric Use

The total number of patients treated with GRALISE in controlled clinical trials in patients with postherpetic neuralgia was 359, of which 63% were 65 years of age or older. The types and incidence of adverse events were similar across age groups except for peripheral edema, which tended to increase in incidence with age.

Hepatic Impairment

Because gabapentin is not metabolized, studies have not been conducted in patients with hepatic impairment.

Renal Impairment

Dosage adjustment of GRALISE is necessary in patients with impaired renal function. GRALISE should not be administered in patients with creatinine clearance <30 mL/min or in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Reductions in GRALISE dose should be made in patients with age-related compromised renal function.

For more information about GRALISE, please see full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide.

References: 1. Mehta N, Bucior I, Bujanover S, Shah R, Gulati A. Relationship between pain relief, reduction in pain-associated sleep interference, and overall impression of improvement in patients with postherpetic neuralgia treated with extended-release gabapentin. Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2016;14(4):54. 2. Lee DH, Park JE, Yoon DM, Yoon KB, Kim K, Kim SH. Factors associated with increased risk for clinical insomnia in patients with postherpetic neuralgia: a retrospective cross-sectional study. Pain Med. 2016;17(10):1917-1922. 3. GRALISE [prescribing information]. Newark, CA: Depomed, Inc.; September 2015. 4. Argoff CE, Chen C, Cowles VE. Clinical development of a once-daily gastroretentive formulation of gabapentin for treatment of postherpetic neuralgia: an overview. Expert Opin Drug Deliv. 2012;9(9):1147-1160.